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Purple Kohlrabi (Ganth Gobi) & Apple Slaw-Salad

I’ve had the strangest week with my refrigerator, and I’m pretty sure you’ve had days too when for no apparent reason, the contents of the vegetable crisper will be absolutely frozen over, but the popsicles in the freezer just won’t set? The settings seemed fine, but I did my share of the customary fidgeting with the knobs, you know, in the same sort of way as pulling out the SIM card from your mobile phone (pre-iPhone days, of course) and placing it back seemed to cure it of any kind of malfunctioning? All this uncertainty with the fridge meant that I had to cook my way through all the fresh produce _quickly. _I couldn’t rescue the greens, but managed to get to this batch of purple kohlrabi in the nick of time.

Honestly, I’d never made anything with kohlrabi, so I reached out to you on the blog’s Facebook page and asked for help. And you, my readers, told me that kohlrabi is no stranger to Indian cooking! You told me that it’s called ‘monja haak’ in Kashmir and even goes by the name of ‘ganth gobi’. On a slight ‘aside’ (I stay true to my theatrical roots), I love that Facebook, Twitter and Instagram sometimes serve as a behind-the-scenes look at the blog and my life in general. I cherish such conversations where we reach out to each other!

And speaking of conversations, a bunch of us Mumbai Food Bloggers met up at Bandra’s ‘Smoke House Deli’ last Saturday to basically get to know each other beyond our blog personas. We chatted about how we got blogging, the things we want to learn and some concerns that we had about the developing blogging scene. I snapped up this picture, a feeble attempt at trying to capture everyone present. Can you spot your favourite bloggers?

Okay, now that I’m done with digressing, back to the kohlrabi! For my maiden attempt at working with this vegetable, I was very keen to let its flavour stand out and not be overshadowed by any ‘masala’. I remembered Yotam Ottolenghi’s words that purple kohlrabi is often eaten as a salad in West Asia. So I started with that thought, and picked a recipe for a sort of slaw-salad, which seemed appropriate since coleslaw is usually made with finely shredded cabbage and kohlrabi, in turn, belongs to the cabbage family. The pairing with apple and pomegranate brings out the mellow, sweet undertones of purple kohlrabi. The citrus tang of the dressing compliments the salad in a way that keeps it from becoming a completely ‘sweet’ salad.

We tucked into this salad as a side that accompanied leftover chicken and paired it up with some bread that our neighbour brought from Byculla. And because life isn’t picture-perfect, we only had a call from our serviceman to fix the fridge, as opposed to a visit… and how do you think he suggested we fix the fridge? “You need to just adjust the temperature knob, madam!”

Recipe adapted from The Nourished Kitchen: Farm-to-Table Recipes for the Traditional Foods Lifestyle Featuring Bone Broths, Fermented Vegetables, Grass-Fed Meats, Wholesome Fats, Raw Dairy, and Kombuchas

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Purple Kohlrabi (Ganth Gobi) & Apple Slaw-Salad
I’ve had the strangest week with my refrigerator, and I’m pretty sure you’ve had days too when for no apparent reason, the contents of the vegetable crisper will be absolutely frozen over, but the popsicles in the freezer just won’t set? The settings seemed fine, but I did my share of the customary
Servings
serving
Ingredients
Servings
serving
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Cut off the stems & leaves of the kohlrabi with a paring knife. You could use a paring knife or a Y-shaped peeler (that’s what I used) to peel the slightly tough outer layer of the kohlrabi. Slice the kohlrabi in half & then cut it into matchsticks, roughly 1/16thof an inch thick & about 1 ½ inches in length. (You’ll find that the kohlrabi is easier to slice than peel).
  2. 2. Remove the cores of the apple, but don’t peel them. Cut them into matchsticks, roughly the same size as the kohlrabi.
  3. 3. In a bowl, toss together the kohlrabi, apple, pomegranate seeds and parsley.
  4. 4. Add all the ingredients for the dressing to a small jar or glass and whisk together really well to combine. Pour the dressing over the salad and toss well before serving. Ideally, you should add the dressing only when you are ready to serve this salad.
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